Book Analysis 2016

I like to keep track of how many books I read (I’ve been doing it since 2008) but I’ve not really done much analysis other than an occasional, vaguely guilty realisation that I read a lot of of kids’ books. So first, some statistics and then some Q&A I got from Google.

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Gollancz Festival 2016

Two weeks ago, I went to London, to go to the Gollancz Festival, at Foyles on Charing Cross Road. Because I had to get there on Saturday morning from the Wild West, I opted to attend the Saturday afternoon panels session and, with much more trepidation, the author party in the evening.

I’ve read a few Gollancz books – Scott Lynch’s three, Joanne Harris’s The Gospel of Loki, Joe Abercrombie’s First Law trilogy plus one or two of the standalones and maybe a couple of others. I was mainly going for Lynch – The Lies of Locke Lamora has been my favourite book for about nine years now. I know I’ve never written a post about it. I want to and I’m going to but it’s difficult to talk about a book I love so much.

There were four panels of three authors – as listed:

Utopia vs Conflict
Ezekiel Boone, Al Robertson & Jon Wallace

The Comfort Zone: Leave or Remain
Alex Lamb, Miles Cameron & Christopher Priest

Don’t Make Me Laugh
Stephen Deas, Tom Lloyd & Simon Morden

Does Anyone Need a Wee?
Ben Aaronovitch, Ed Cox, Joanne Harris & Scott Lynch

I can’t remember everything – most of it, in fact. I wasn’t taking notes. Most of the authors came across as bright, smart, friendly people, people I liked, even if I didn’t like or had no interest in their books. We were given goodie bags which contained, amongst other things, samplers of new Gollancz books. I read Boone’s The Hatching which I enjoyed but it’s horror, monster horror, and I can’t and won’t read the full book. One about dragon-riding, I couldn’t even finish the sampler. I’ve read Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London which I thought was ok but it didn’t grab me in the way it seems to have grabbed a lot of people. But all the authors seemed nice – surprising number working other jobs as well as writing. I guess I thought once you’d got a full-size novel published, that became your full time job, especially if you’d published a few but evidently not necessarily.

Scott Lynch forewent the mic (“I’m American, we make our own”), Christopher Priest kept not paying attention to the questions in a hilarious way, Joanne Harris started off with no idea what she was going to talk about and Ben Aaronovitch is just generally fantastic. I did enjoy the last panel most – surprise surprise, that was the one I went to see. Logistics in fantasy and worldbuilding, or worldbuilding vs story.

Miles Cameroon answered a question by asking who in the audience was a writer or an aspiring writer. Three quarters of us, it turns out. I don’t really feel like I belong in those numbers – SF/F fans can be somewhat elitist and I often feel I don’t fit but also I can’t and will not write science fiction or fantasy. Other than very short stories if I’m in the right frame of mind, I can’t write fiction at all. It’s not my thing. My writing projects are I Am A Polar Bear and the Arctic travelogue. A novel remains a very distant and probably unachievable daydream.

I got my battered nine-year-old copy of TLOLL signed by Scott. He had the longest queue of all the authors – it held up the party. (And I was quietly pleased to see how many of the books he was given to sign were brand new, unread and picked up from the table as the signing began. New fans are good but now it was my turn to feel elitist because I’d already read and loved them, and here’s a battered and much-read book to prove it).

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The party didn’t go quite so well. I’m not a person who’s any good at mingling with strangers. I had a glass of something sweet and fuzzy and nearly wine-colour and I sat on the floor at the back, as did another two girls, warily watching proceedings.

The Gollancz folk are great. First Gillian Redfearn, Publishing Director herself, came to squat in front of me to make sure I was ok and comfortable and had a drink and tried to encourage me to come and talk to people in yellow lanyards, before taking to the stage with Scott Lynch, Joe Abercrombie and Tom Lloyd to interview them about their special tenth anniversary editions.I came close to watch that. And then I wandered and looked at people and got more drinks and then I was seized by another lovely Gollancz lady whose name I didn’t get, who dragged me off to find whichever author I wanted to chat to. (None of them. What can I say except “I really liked your book!” or “”I’ve never read your book or heard of you”? I did enjoy spotting Stephen Baxter – ten years ago, my friend Nigel spent an entire car journey from the valleys of South Wales to Canterbury telling me every detail of the story of the Xeelee Sequence. I’ve still never read any of it.

This lovely lady dragged me over to Tom Lloyd, joined in his chat and once he was settled into talking to someone and I was standing nervously beside him, she hopped off to mingle with someone else. I like Tom a lot, he seemed like what my dad might call “a good chap” but… I’d never heard of him, never heard of his books, never read the books. Even if I was a chatty person who’s naturally good at talking to strangers, what can I say to him?

I decided my best bet was to lurk next to the book table, read the backs of them, add some of them to my mental reading list and hope that it would soon be over. But then there was a lady next to me, asking me about them and I found myself trying to explain the books I’d read and the books I’d heard of. I sort of wondered if she was a mole, a Gollancz person without a Gollancz lanyard, partner of one of the authors. But she wasn’t, she was just a friendly Kiwi, accompanying her husband to an event she didn’t have much interest in herself, pulling me over to talk to her husband and another stray friend they’d made.

It finished at 8.30pm promptly, to my relief, despite everyone’s efforts to involve me. I’d been on my feet, with my knees more or less locked for nearly four hours and it hurt to hop down several flights of stairs, glad to be away, back into the dark of London.

Kindle: finding a place for it

E-books are divisive creatures, no doubt. The reading world is split between those who love the TARDIS-like nature of the Kindle for transporting an entire library in a handbag and those who will die on the point of a sword defending ink-and-paper books. I used to be firmly in the latter camp and now… well, I hover on their outskirts, close enough to hear conversation inside the tents.

I began to warm to Kindles when my granddad acquired one. He was a lifelong technophobe, in his eighties, probably legally blind and with an alarming prediliction for the works of Jeffrey Archer. Three generations of Frosts thought the Kindle would be back in its box in disgust within hours. But he got on really well with it. He could increase the text size to two words per page so he could actually see it, it came with a built-in light and if he fell asleep, it didn’t lose his page. We were astonished.

I inherited the Kindle. It was a book-thing, an electronic-thing and it was unloved and unwanted. Of course I adopted it. I reset the Amazon account, gave it a wash – yes, with water, but very carefully (incontinent 85-year-olds do not leave all their possessions smelling of roses) – and bought it a new cover.

I still don’t have many books on it. But it came into its own at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe over the summer. You spend a lot of time queuing or waiting and I found that the Kindle, minus cover, fitted much better into my little bag than a real book, and it didn’t care one bit if one of its plastic corners got a bit up close and friendly with my wallet or camera. If I finished a book, most venues had wifi, I could download another one immediately.Handy thing.

Having finished watching episode one of the BBC’s new series, The Night Manager, last week, I was seized with a desire to read the book at 11pm on a Sunday. Oh no, the bookshop’s shut and it probably doesn’t have it in stock anyway! No problem for the Kindle.

What about Scott Lynch’s long-anticipated Republic of Thieves, pre-ordered twice because the original listing got cancelled? By the time it was finally released, I could no longer wait the last two or three days for the book to pop through my letterbox. I got a head start with the Kindle. (I do only do this for special books, I don’t make a habit of buying them twice.)

Finally, although I mastered the art of reading books safely in the bath probably before I could walk, I do like the security of slipping the Kindle into its watertight case.

I will always be first and foremost a fan of real books. But I recognise and acknowledge that there’s a place in the world for the digital book as well.

Book Analysis 2015

I like to keep track of how many books I read (I’ve been doing it since 2008) but I’ve not really done much analysis other than an occasional, vaguely guilty realisation that I read a lot of of kids’ books. So first, some statistics and then some Q&A I got from Google.

Total:
2008 – 78
2009 – 44
2010 – 29
2011 – 48
2012 – 73
2013 – 64
2014 – 74
2015 – 100

Number of new books:
2008 – 38 (49% of total)
2009 – 12 (27% of total)
2010 – 13 (45% of total)
2011 – 22 (46% of total)
2012 – 31 (42% of total)
2013 – 22 ( 34% of total)
2014 – 27 (36% of total)
2015 – 52 (52% of total)

Number of kids’ books:
2008 – 35 (45% of total)
2009 – 21 (48% of total)
2010 – 17 (59% of total)
2011 – 19 (40% of total)
2012 – 38 (52% of total)
2013 – 26 (41% of total)
2014 – 38 (51% of total)
2015 – 49 (49% of total)

Number of scifi/fantasy books (sorry to lump these together; sometimes it’s not easy to pick which one a book fits into)
2008 – 52 (67% of total)
2009 – 12 (27% of total)
2010 – 12 (41% of total)
2011 – 19 (40% of total)
2012 – 34 (47% of total)
2013 – 34 (53% of total)
2014 – 38 (51% of total)
2015 – 40 (40% of total)

Number of crime books:
2008 – 0
2009 – 0
2010 – 2 (7% of total)
2011 – 11 (23% of total)
2012 – 8 (11% of total)
2013 – 9 (14% of total)
2014 – 3 (4% of total)
2015 – 18 (18% of total)

Number of non-fiction books:
2008 – 6 (8% of total)
2009 – 5 (11% of total)
2010 – 0
2011 – 2 (4% of total)
2012 – 3 (4% of total)
2013 – 2 (3% of total)
2014 – 2 (3% of total)
2015 – 2 (2% of total)

Number of plays:
2008 – 0
2009 – 2 (5% of total)
2010 – 0
2011 – 0
2012 – 1 (1% of total)
2013 – 2 (3% of total)
2014 – 0
2015 – 0

And now some questions:

1. Best Book You Read In 2015? (If you have to cheat — you can break it down by genre if you want or 2015 release vs. backlist)

I will never not love The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch but my favourite new book – either Terry Pratchett’s Witches Abroad, Joe Abercrombie’s Half the World or Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell.

02. Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?

I finally got round to reading Jesse Burton’s The Miniaturist, which people have raved about and which looked beautiful and… I didn’t particularly enjoy it. Or The Night Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko, which I had hugely hyped up by the bookseller and which just didn’t really work for me.

03. Most surprising (in a good way!) book of 2015?

Don’t laugh. Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl, both because it turns out I’ve never actually read it and because I had no idea that it was going to go the way it did.

04. Book you read in 2015 that you recommended to people most in 2015?

Actually literally recommended to people is probably The Saga of the Volsungs. Let me do so again: it’s a genuine original Viking saga from nearly a millennium ago and it’s basically the blueprint for Tolkien. It has the original cursed ring, the original dragon on a hoard of gold, it has my favourite ever “fantasy” heroine, Gudrun, it has Odin messing with mortals for the fun of it, it has sassy werewolves, it has Valkyries, it has everything – if you like your Tolkien-esque fantasy, this is where it began.

05. Best series you discovered in 2015?

I don’t know that I discovered it in 2015 because I’d read a few books before but I got into Discworld a little bit. A bookseller and NaNoWriMo acquaintance recommended me the Witches series when I thought I’d just start at the beginning and force myself to try and like it – and I genuinely did enjoy the Witches, enough to go out and buy the next five books on the strength of the first. As far as a new series goes, I very much enjoyed Joe Abercrombie’s Shattered Sea series, only I’m stranded without the third book because I’m determined to have it in a paperback matching the first two and it’s not out until March.

06. Favorite new author you discovered in 2015?

I don’t know if I read much by anyone new. Well, I did but none of it is really up there as new favourites. I suppose Susanna Clarke is new and I did enjoy Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. I’d heard it can be hard to get into so I thought I’d watch it first to make it easier. I still haven’t seen so much as five minutes of the TV series but I had no problem reading it.

07. Best book that was out of your comfort zone or was a new genre for you?

No, see, I read for pleasure, so I don’t go seeking things that I’m not comfortable with. I suppose I’m not all that comfortable with exactly how many Chalet School books I read (25) but that’s not the question. I thought Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell was going to be out of my comfort zone but no, apparently not.

08. Most thrilling, unputdownable book in 2015?

The Bones Beneath by Mark Billingham, I think. I was reading that at a comedy club in Guildford (not while anyone was on stage!) and getting very into it.

09. Book You Read In 2015 That You Are Most Likely To Re-Read Next Year?

Scott Lynch, Scott Lynch, Scott Lynch. I daresay I’ll reread quite a few Chalet Schools. Neil Gaiman’s American Gods – that gets reread pretty regularly. It’s satisfying to my soul.

10. Favorite cover of a book you read in 2015?

The Discworld Hardback Library books are very nice-looking. Robert Galbraith’s books manage to be bright and jewel-like while being very dark at the same time, which I like. Garth Nix’s books are beautiful. And so are Neil Gaiman’s preferred text books – the black ones with the coloured metallic art. And finally, I’ve never seen an unpretty cover on His Dark Materials, although I’m very partial to the particular ones I’ve got.

11. Most memorable character in 2015?

After a year in which I’ve read too much Chalet School, Mary-Lou Trelawney stands out a lot. Granny Weatherwax. Thursday Next. Harry Potter & co. Kurt Wallander.

12. Most beautifully written book read in 2015?

I’m not very good at this question. I’ve heard people talk about the writing style of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, so I guess that’s a candidate. Neil Gaiman’s American Gods and Neverwhere (does that mean it last year I read Anansi Boys? Stick that on the list for 2016 then).

13. Book that had the greatest impact on you in 2015?

Well, Witches Abroad in that it finally brought me into the Discworld fold. There’s one I’ve read in the last couple of months, and I can’t find it, that had me awake and musing over it every night for about a week. Alexander Armstrong’s In the Land of the Midnight Sun because it made me think that if he could write that book I could write that book (31,500 words thus far and still growing, if slower than it was).

14. Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2015 to finally read?

Eoin Colfer’s WARP: The Reluctant Assassin because I’ve had it ever since it came out – in hardback, because I was so desperate to read it. Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator, as mentioned.

15. Favorite Passage/Quote From A Book You Read In 2015?

 

Again, I don’t really do this but have Gudrun’s Crowning Moment of Awesome from towards the end of The Saga of the Volsungs (spoilers!)

 

16.Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2015?

Shortest must have been The Chalet School and Rosalie, a wee little booklet originally published as a short story in an annual, I think. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is probably up there for longest, with possible competition from American Gods. Scott Lynch’s Red Seas Under Red Skies is a huge book but that’s just the edition I own (I have no idea how they squish it into a normal-sized paperback without either shrinking the text hugely or deleting chunks). Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix is pretty big.

17. Book That Had A Scene In It That Had You Reeling And Dying To Talk To Somebody About It? (a WTF moment, an epic revelation, a steamy kiss, etc. etc.) Be careful of spoilers!

…No-oo, I don’t think there was anything. I did ask my sister about The Miniaturist (“am I missing something or did you also not think that was as brilliant as it was made out to be?”). Clariel by Garth Nix could have had a big reveal and a big shock if I’d paid more attention to the original trilogy but that passed me by.

18. Favorite Relationship From A Book You Read In 2015 (be it romantic, friendship, etc).

I am fond of the ever-exasperated love/hate between Granny Weatherwax and Magrat Garlick. Tom Thorne and Phil Hendricks. Gudrun and Atli oh god Gudrun and Atli.

19. Favorite Book You Read in 2015 From An Author You’ve Read Previously

The vast majority of books I read were from authors I’ve read previously. The Lies of Locke Lamora? Can I have that one again? Half the World is a new one I really liked, by an author (Joe Abercrombie) that I already knew.

20. Best Book You Read In 2015 That You Read Based SOLELY On A Recommendation From Somebody Else:

Witches Abroad. Left to my own devices, starting Discworld at the beginning, I would never have got as far as Witches Abroad without being personally recommended it. Does “the BBC making a big shiny miniseries out of it” (even if I never actually got around to watching it) count as a recommendation, because I enjoyed Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell.

21. Genre You Read The Most From in 2015?

Girls Own, colonial-era boarding school children’s books. The Chalet School, plus a couple of LM Montgomery, plus What Katy Did At School plus one of Anne Digby’s Trebizon books. If you filter that lot out, it’s probably fantasy (again, kind of skewed towards the child-friendly end of the spectrum, I think).

22. Newest fictional crush from a book you read in 2015?

I do have a soft spot for Locke Lamora, of course. Lord Asriel from His Dark Materials sort of feels a bit like a Heathcliffe type, but I wouldn’t go as far as to call him a crush. But neither of them are new. I suppose I’d forgotten Anne Rice’s Lestat is written to make you adore him and I did adore him so much as a teenager. Lancelot from The Once and Future King and Lestat from The Vampire Chronicles, that was teenage me.

23. Best 2015 debut you read?

I’m not sure what this question means. Best new book of 2015 or best first-time author? I don’t think I have any authors new in 2015 and I’m not certain how many books. Half A World was new in 2015 and that was very good.

24. Most vivid world/imagery in a book you read in 2015?

Well, anything by Neil Gaiman for a start. Harry PotterNorthern Lights. The Bones Beneath. Did anything give me nightmares? I sort of think something might have done – or at least that it couldn’t get it out of my head at night. I wonder what that was? The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith definitely had some… vivid (graphic!) scenes.

25. Book That Was The Most Fun To Read in 2015?

Discworld is fun. Harry Potter is fun, especially around the middle of the series. Thursday Next is fun. I find Galbraith’s Cormoran Strike books fun, perhaps strangely.

26. Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2015?

Ished a few tears over Jacqueline Wilson’s The Illustrated Mum but the only book I can’t go back to because I cry too much, believe it or not, is one of Jeremy Clarkson’s. It’s a collection of his newspaper articles and one of them is about Concorde’s retirement and I can feel tears stinging the back of my eyes just thinking about it.

27. Book You Read in 2015 That You Think Got Overlooked This Year Or When It Came Out?

Well, I think more people should be reading and talking about Jasper Fforde and his Thursday Next series. Same goes for Joe Abercrombie and his everything but especially the Shattered Sea series because it’s marketed as YA and gets overlooked by people who would read his adult stuff.

Books I Read in 2015

  1. What Happens in London* – Julia Quinn – 03/01 – 03/01
  2. Tickling the English – Dara O Briain – 03/01 – 17/01
  3. American Gods – Neil Gaiman – 05/01 – 20/01
  4. The Chalet School Wins the Trick* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 05/01 – 05/01
  5. A Rebel at the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 06/01 – 06/01
  6. The New House at the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 07/01 – 07/01
  7. Peggy of the Chalet School* – 10/01 – 12/01
  8. The Rivals of the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 16/01 – 16/01
  9. Witches Abroad* – Terry Pratchett – 20/01 – 22/01
  10. Jo Returns to the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 22/01 – 23/01
  11. The New Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 23/01 – 24/01
  12. A United Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 24/01 – 24/01
  13. The Chalet School in Exile* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 25/01 – 26/01
  14. Swallows & Amazons – Arthur Ransome – 25/01 – 11/02
  15. Carola Storms the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 29/01 – 31/01
  16. The Eyre Affair – Jasper Fforde – 13/02 – 17/02
  17. Lost in a Good Book – Jasper Fforde – 18/02 – 25/02
  18. Mary-Lou at the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 20/02 – 21/02
  19. Well of Lost Plots – Jasper Fforde – 26/02 – 04/03
  20. The Silkworm* – Robert Galbraith – 04/03 – 07/03
  21. Something Rotten – Jasper Fforde – 09/03 – 13/03
  22. Good As Dead* – Mark Billingham – 14/03 – 14/03
  23. The Dying Hours* – Mark Billingham – 16/03 – 18/03
  24. The Redbreast* – Jo Nesbo – 19/03 – 01/04
  25. The Chalet School & Barbara – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 21/03 – 22/03
  26. The Bones Beneath* – Mark Billingham – 28/03 – 29/03
  27. The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch – 29/03 – 21/04
  28. Visitors to the Chalet School* – Helen McClelland – 04/04 – 05/04
  29. The Dogs of Riga – Henning Mankell – 07/04 – 13/04
  30. The Lottie Project – Jacqueline Wilson – 18/04 – 19/04
  31. Prince Lestat* – Anne Rice – 21/04 – 30/04
  32. Five On A Treasure Island – Enid Blyton – 27/04 – 27/04
  33. Five Go Adventuring Again – Enid Blyton – 27/04 – 27/04
  34. Equal Rites* – Terry Pratchett – 30/04 – 02/05
  35. The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett – 04/05 – 04/05
  36. Wyrd Sisters* – Terry Pratchett – 05/05 – 07/05
  37. Cloud Atlas* – David Mitchell – 08/05 – 14/05
  38. The Miniaturist* – Jesse Burton – 14/05 – 20/05
  39. Lords & Ladies* – Terry Pratchett – 21/05 – 25/05
  40. Anne of the Island – LM Montgomery – 21/05 – 24/05
  41. The New House at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 25/05 – 25/05
  42. Maskerade* – Terry Pratchett – 26/05 – 27/05
  43. Red Seas Under Red Skies – Scott Lynch – 27/05 – 08/06
  44. Rainbow Valley – LM Montgomery – 29/05 – 31/05
  45. A United Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 31/05 – 31/05
  46. All Fun & Games Until Somebody Loses an Eye – Christopher Brookmyre – 09/06 – 13/06
  47. Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky – Patrick Hamilton – 15/06 – 25/06
  48. Half a King* – Joe Abercrombie – 25/06 – 27/06
  49. Half the World* – Joe Abercrombie – 27/06 – 02/07
  50. Clariel* – Garth Nix – 03/07 – 08/07
  51. Sabriel – Garth Nix – 09/07 – 14/07
  52. The Saga of the Volsungs – 20/07 – 22/07
  53. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell* – Susanna Clarke – 25/07 – 10/08
  54. The Illustrated Mum – Jacqueline Wilson – 09/08 – 09/08
  55. Rivers of London – Ben Aaronovitch – 11/08 – 16/08
  56. First Among Sequels – Jasper Fforde – 17/08 – 20/08
  57. The Children of Willow Farm – Enid Blyton – 19/08 – 19/08
  58. One of Our Thursdays Is Missing – Jasper Fforde – 21/08 – 24/08
  59. The Night Circus* – Erin Morgenstern – 22/08 – 24/08
  60. Faceless Killers – Henning Mankell – 24/08 – 26/08
  61. The Woman Who Died A Lot – Jasper Fforde – 24/08 – 01/09
  62. Plugged* – Eoin Colfer – 01/09 – 06/09
  63. Neverwhere – Neil Gaiman – 05/09 – 10/09
  64. Sleepyhead – Mark Billingham – 11/09 – 17/09
  65. Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone – JK Rowling – 17/09 – 18/09
  66. Charlie & the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl – 19/09 – 19/09
  67. Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator* – Roald Dahl – 19/09 – 20/09
  68. Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets – JK Rowling – 20/09 – 23/09
  69. Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban – 24/09 – 26/09
  70. Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire – JK Rowling – 27/09 – 01/10
  71. Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix – 02/10 – 05/10
  72. Harry Potter & the Half-Blood Prince – JK Rowling – 06/10 – 09/10
  73. Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows – JK Rowling – 10/10 – 12/10
  74. The Night Watch* – Sergei Lukyanenko – 13/10 – 24/10
  75. The Land of the Midnight Sun* – Alexander Armstrong – 17/10 – 25/10
  76. Summer Camp at Trebizon – Anne Digby – 26/10 – 26/10
  77. Scaredy Cat – Mark Billingham – 27/10 – 04/11
  78. A Leader in the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 31/10 – 31/10
  79. A Feud in the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 01/11 – 01/11
  80. Northern Lights – Philip Pullman – 05/11 – 08/11
  81. Snowblind* – Ragnar Jonasson – 07/11 – 21/11
  82. The Chalet School & Rosalie* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 08/11 – 08/11
  83. The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch – 09/11 – 20/11
  84. The Chalet School & Richenda* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 13/11 – 13/11
  85. What Katy Did at School – Susan Coolidge – 15/11 – 15/11
  86. Career of Evil* – Robert Galbraith – 22/11 – 23/11
  87. Screwed* – Eoin Colfer – 24/11 – 28/11
  88. Shocks for the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 23/11 – 23/11
  89. Changes for the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 26/11 – 26/11
  90. The Chalet School Triplets* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 29/11 – 29/11
  91. Before the Frost* – Henning Mankell – 30/11 – 03/12
  92. Jane and the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 30/11 – 02/12
  93. An Event in Autumn* – Henning Mankell – 04/12 – 04/12th
  94. Summer Term at Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 05/12 – 05/12
  95. The Troubled Man* – Henning Mankell – 06/12 – 10/12
  96. Two Sams at the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 11/12 – 11/12
  97. WARP: The Reluctant Assassin* – Eoin Colfer – 12/12 – 18/12
  98. Red Seas Under Red Skies – Scott Lynch – 18/12 – 27/12
  99. Emily Climbs – LM Montgomery – 27/12 – 29/12
  100. Once Upon A Time In the North* – Philip Pullman – 30/12 – 31/12

* new reads

Books I Read in 2014

1) Northern Lights – Philip Pullman – 02/01 – 04/01
2) The Subtle Knife – Philip Pullman – 05/01 – 06/01
3) The Amber Spyglass – Philip Pullman – 08/01 – 10/01
4) Republic of Thieves – Scott Lynch – 12/01 – 25/01
5) The Fifth Woman* – Henning Mankell – 25/01 – 28/01
6) Labyrinth – Mark T Sullivan – 29/01 – 31/01
7) 1984* – George Orwell – 01/02 – 12/02
8) Boy Trouble at Trebizon – Anne Digby – 06/02 – 06/02
9) Rivals – Jilly Cooper – 08/02 – 09/02
10) Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone – JK Rowling – 13/02 – 13/02
11) Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets – JK Rowling – 14/02 – 14/02
12) Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban – JK Rowling – 14/02 – 15/02
13) Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire – JK Rowling – 15/02 – 19/02
14) Harry Potter & the Order of the Phoenix – JK Rowling – 20/02 – 23/02
15) Harry Potter & the Half-Blood Prince – JK Rowling – 23/02 – 24/02
16) Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows – JK Rowling – 25/02 – 01/03
17) Imajica* – Clive Barker – 03/03 – 26/04
18) Half Moon Investigations – Eoin Colfer – 12/03 – 20/03
19) The Naughtiest Girl in the School – Enid Blyton – 24/03 – 24/03
20) The Naughtiest Girl is a Monitor – Enid Blyton – 25/03 – 35/03
21) Sagas of Warrior-Poets* – unknown author/s – 27/03 – 11/04
22) Hacker – Malorie Blackman – 09/04 – 09/04
23) Anansi Boys – Neil Gaiman – 14/04 – 23/04
24) The Brides of Rollrock Island* – Margo Lanagan – 27/04 – 01/05
25) A Game of Thrones* – George RR Martin – 01/05 – 10/05
26) A Clash of Kings* – George RR Martin – 11/05 – 19/05
27) A Storm of Swords: Steel & Snow* – George RR Martin – 19/05 – 26/05
28) A Storm of Swords: Blood & Gold* – George RR Martin – 27/05 – 02/06
29) A Feast for Crows* – George RR Martin – 03/06 – 15/06
30) A Dance with Dragons: Dreams & Dust* – George RR Martin – 16/06 – 28/06
31) A Dance with Dragons: After the Feast* – George RR Martin – 28/06 – 07/07
32) The Eyre Affair – Jasper Fforde – 07/07 – 11/07
33) Lost In A Good Book – Jasper Fforde – 12/07 – 20/07
34) The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch – 05/08 – 13/08
35) The Blade Itself – Joe Abercrombie – 14/08 – 03/09
36) Long Way Round – Ewan McGregor & Charley Boorman – 17/08 – 20/08
37) The Sleepover Club at Kenny’s – Rose Impey – 01/09 – 01/09
38) Before They Are Hanged – Joe Abercrombie – 04/09 – 21/09
39) The Chalet School & Barbara – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 05/09 – 06/09
40) Ruey Richardson at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 14/09 – 14/09
41) Theodora and the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 17/09 – 18/09
42) Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery – 18/09 – 20/09
43) Last Arguments of Kings – Joe Abercrombie – 22/09 – 02/10
44) Red Seas Under Red Skies – Scott Lynch – 02/10 – 10/10
45) New Mistress at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 04/10 – 04/10
46) Feud in the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 05/10 – 05/10
47) The Watcher in the Shadows* – Carlos Ruiz Zafón – 12/10 – 14/10
48) The Republic of Thieves – Scott Lynch – 16/10 – 02/11
49) A Problem for the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 19/10 – 19/10
50) The Chalet Girls in Camp – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 23/10 – 23/10
51) Jo of the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 26/10 – 26/10
52) The Gospel of Loki* – Joanne M Harros – 03/11 – 12/11
53) The Chalet School at War – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 10/11 – 10/11
54) Dracula* – Bram Stoker – 17/11 – 21/11
55) Shadowmagic* – John Lenahan – 23/11 – 26/11
56) The Prince of Hazel & Oak* – John Lenahan – 26/11 – 02/12
57) Chalet School Fete* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 27/11 – 27/11
58) The Chalet Girls Grow Up – Merryn Williams – 28/11 – 28/11
59) Three Go to the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 01/12 – 01/12
60) The Sons of Macha* – John Lenahan – 03/12 – 07/12
61) The Cuckoo’s Calling* – Robert Galbraith – 07/12 – 10/12
62) The Highland Twins at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 03/12 – 10/12
63) The Atheist’s Guide to Xmas* – Various – 11/12 – 16/12
64) The Head Girl at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 11/12 – 13/12
65) A Bear Called Paddington – Michael Bond – 14/12 – 14/12
66) Butterflies in November* – Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir – 16/12 – 19/12
67) From the Dead* – Mark Billingham – 19/12 – 22/12
68) Eustacia Goes to the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 22/12 – 22/12
69) Good Omens – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman – 23/12 – 25/12
70) A Bad Spell for the Worst Witch – Jill Murphy – 26/12 – 28/12
71) Stardust – Neil Gaiman – 28/12 – 28/12
72) Matilda – Roald Dahl – 29/12 – 29/12
73) The Chalet School and the Island – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 29/12 – 29/12
74) Lavender Leigh at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 31/12 – 31/12

* new reads

Book Analysis 2013

I like to keep track of how many books I read (I’ve been doing it since 2008) but I’ve not really done much analysis other than an occasional, vaguely guilty realisation that I read a lot of of kids’ books. So first, some statistics and then some Q&A I got from Google.

Total:
2008 – 78
2009 – 44
2010 – 29
2011 – 48
2012 – 73
2013 – 64

Number of new books:
2008 – 38 (49% of total)
2009 – 12 (27% of total)
2010 – 13 (45% of total)
2011 – 2z (46% of total)
2012 – 31(42% of total)
2013 – 22 ( 34% of total)

Number of kids’ books:
2008 – 35 (45% of total)
2009 – 21 (48% of total)
2010 – 17 (59% of total)
2011 – 19 (40% of total)
2012 – 38 (52% of total)
2013 – 26 (41% of total)

Number of scifi/fantasy books (sorry to lump these together; sometimes it’s not easy to pick which one a book fits into)
2008 – 52 (67% of total)
2009 – 12 (27% of total)
2010 – 12 (41% of total)
2011 – 19 *40% of total)
2012 – 34 (47% of total)
2013 – 34 (53% of total)

Number of crime books:
2008 – 0
2009 – 0
2010 – 2 (7% of total)
2011 – 11 (23% of total)
2012 – 8 (11% of total)
2013 – 9 (14% of total)

Number of non-fiction books:
2008 – 6 (8% of total)
2009 – 5 (11% of total)
2010 – 0
2011 – 2 (4% of total)
2012 – 3 (4% of total)
2013 – 2 (3% of total)

Number of plays:
2008 – 0
2009 – 2 (5% of total)
2010 – 0
2011 – 0
2012 – 1 (1% of total)
2013 – 2 (3% of total)

And now some questions:

1. Best Book You Read In 2013? (If you have to cheat — you can break it down by genre if you want or 2013 release vs. backlist)

I guess it has to be Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Locke Lamora – it’s a long-standing favourite and it’s going to take quite a book to steal my heart from it. In second place is… the entire Once and Future King series by TH White. Another long-standing favourite.

02. Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?

Rivers of London. People raved about it and… I enjoyed it, I didn’t hate it but I was expecting it to be The Best Book Ever and it was only quite good.

03. Most surprising (in a good way!) book of 2013?

The Wallander series by Henning Mankell. Because I wasn’t expecting to enjoy it so much I devoured pretty much the entire series in a few weeks. My Uncle Oswald by Roald Dahl was the most surprising but not so much in a good way.

04. Book you read in 2013 that you recommended to people most in 2013?

Oh, that’s always the Lies of Locke Lamora. I’ve been recommending it to people for years. Don’t tell me if you don’t enjoy it, I don’t want to know that.

05. Best series you discovered in 2013?

I enjoyed Hugh Howey’s Wool series. Technically I didn’t discover the Wallander series in 2013 but that’s when I started reading. Either of those.

06. Favorite new author you discovered in 2013?

Alright, let’s say Hugh Howey. I picked up the first one at Heathrow, the second at Edinburgh Airport and I sought out the last one in a non-airport bookshop. To be fair, Wool was the only book in all of Heathrow that looked worth even trying to read that evening.

07. Best book that was out of your comfort zone or was a new genre for you?

Macbeth. I’m neither a Shakespeare fan nor a fan of reading plays but I really liked Macbeth. It’s so dark!

08. Most thrilling, unputdownable book in 2013?

Dust, third in the Wool series. I read that during a comedy show, or at least I started it and I felt a little like the comedian in question was interrupting me when he came onto the stage.

09. Book You Read In 2013 That You Are Most Likely To Re-Read Next Year?

All the Scott Lynch ones. I’ve read them every year since I started keeping records. Probably some of the Artemis Fowl ones.

10. Favorite cover of a book you read in 2013?

That’s just unfair. No, I won’t answer that. Wool has a great cover. The Thursday Next books are very eye-catching. The Republic of Thieves is nice.

11. Most memorable character in 2013?

Uncle Oswald, from My Uncle Oswald by Roald Dahl, mostly for totally the wrong reasons.

12. Most beautifully written book read in 2013?

After much consideration, I think I’m going to say The Once and Future King, the five TH White books. They’re a work of art and they tell a great story. (I could give The Book of Merlyn a miss, though)

13. Book that had the greatest impact on you in 2013?

That’s the Once and Future King as well. I read it in my tent in Iceland and dreamed about knights almost every night. I very rarely dream about what I’ve been reading so that clearly got into my head.

14. Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2013 to finally read?

Old Magic by Marianne Curley. Only because I bought it years ago and was certain I’d read it. But I didn’t remember any of it and the book looked untouched so I can only conclude that I didn’t. Not in a “I can’t believe it’s only now that this masterpiece has come to me!” way.

15. Favorite Passage/Quote From A Book You Read In 2013?

Easy. Njal’s Saga:

One day, [Guðrun] asked to go to a nut grove to amuse herself, and Asvard went with her. Hrapp went looking for them and found them in the grove and took her by the hand and let her off alone. Asvard went looking for her and found the two of them lying together in some bushes. He ran at them with his axe raised and hacked at Hrapp’s leg but Hrapp moved quickly and Asvard missed him. Hrapp sprang to his feet as fast as he could and seized his axe. Asvard tried to get away; Hrapp hacked his backbone in two.
Then Guðrun spoke: “The deed you’ve just done means that you may no longer stay with my father. But there is another thing which will displease him even more – I’m going to have a child.”
Hrapp answered, “He won’t learn this from others. I’ll go back and tell him both these things.”
“You won’t get away from there with your life then,” she said.
“I’ll take that chance,” he said.
After that he took her to the other women and he went to the hall.
Guðbrand was sitting in his high seat and only a few men were in the room. Hrapp walked up to him holding his axe high.
Guðbrand asked, “Why is your axe bloody?”
“I have been taking care of Asvard’s backache,” he said.
“Not out of good will, I suppose,” said Guðbrand. “You must have killed him.”
“That’s true,” said Hrapp.
“What was the reason?” said Guðbrand.
“It will seem petty to you,” said Hrapp, “but he was trying to cut off my leg.”

That was written a millennium ago. Isn’t it beautiful?

16.Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2013?

Shortest was Artemis Fowl & the Seventh Dwarf because it’s a wee little World Book Day booklet. Longest must have been Njal’s Saga which is not only long but very hard-going, despite gems like “he was trying to cut off my leg”.

17. Book That Had A Scene In It That Had You Reeling And Dying To Talk To Somebody About It? (a WTF moment, an epic revelation, a steamy kiss, etc. etc.) Be careful of spoilers!

The entirety of My Uncle Oswald. I think there’s a post about it on this very blog. I want to tell everyone about it but childhood hero Roald Dahl writing about quite graphically raping his way around 1920s Europe may not be to everyone’s tastes.

18. Favorite Relationship From A Book You Read In 2013 (be it romantic, friendship, etc).

I think it’s Arthur & Lancelot from the Once and Future King. Lancelot is just such a mess of emotions and he loves Arthur but he’s also having an affair with Arthur’s wife and Arthur knows it. Or Njal and Gunnar from Njal’s Saga. Their wives are murdering as much of Iceland as they can and the men just stand aside with gritted teeth and reassure each other that this isn’t going to affect their friendship.

19. Favorite Book You Read in 2013 From An Author You’ve Read Previously

The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch. I really like Scott Lynch and I’ve been waiting for Republic of Thieves for about five years. I was always going to love it.

20. Best Book You Read In 2013 That You Read Based SOLELY On A Recommendation From Somebody Else:

I don’t really take recommendations very often. I think I read the Wallander books on the strength of a Tumblr post I stumbled across but that’s the only one.

21. Genre You Read The Most From in 2013?

Scifi/fantasy. Again, sorry for crushing those two genres together. I hate it too but it’s hard to decide which category the likes of Thursday Next should go in.

22. Newest fictional crush from a book you read in 2013?

I don’t really do that. I did have a ridiculous crush on TH White’s Lancelot as a teenager; I suppose that got rekindled a little bit this year.

23. Best 2013 debut you read?

The Republic of Thieves. As I said, having been anticipating it for a long time, chances were I was always going to love this book.

24. Most vivid world/imagery in a book you read in 2013?

The Artemis Fowls, the Thursdays Nexts and Wool. I can picture all three of them so vividly it feels like I’ve seen a film of them.

25. Book That Was The Most Fun To Read in 2013?

The Practical Princess is fun – no damsels in distress here. Or the Starlight Barking because it’s a bonkers scifi/fantasy sequel to 101 Dalmations, which is utterly unexpected if you haven’t read it before. Do read it, it’s not huge or complicated but it does make you wonder what on earth Dodie Smith was thinking to write this as a sequel to 101 Dalmations.

26. Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2013?

I don’t think I can think of a book that’s ever made me cry or want to cry. I can think of at least two books that have given me nightmares, though.

27. Book You Read in 2013 That You Think Got Overlooked This Year Or When It Came Out?

The Republic of Thieves! I know the market’s flooded with scifi/fantasy but honestly, I think Scott Lynch is great and more people should read these books.

Books I Read in 2013

1) Artemis Fowl – Eoin Colfer – 01/01 – 01/01
2) Artemis Fowl & the Arctic Incident – Eoin Colfer – 01/01 – 03/01
3) The Dogs of Riga* – Henning Mankell – 02/01 – 04/01
4) The Man Who Smiled* – Henning Mankell – 05/01 – 09/01
5) Artemis Fowl & The Eternity Code – Eoin Colfer – 06/01 – 13/01
6) The Pyramid* – Henning Mankell – 10/01 – 16/01
7) Njal’s Saga* – 09/03 – 15/05
8) Firewall* – Henning Mankell – 19/01 – 22/01
9) Pongwiffy – Kaye Umansky – 25/01 – 27/01
10) One Step Behind* – Henning Mankell – 30/01 – 01/02
11) The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch – 31/01 – 09/03
12) Anne of the Island – LM Montgomery – 10/03 – 13/03
13) Faceless Killers* – Henning Mankell – 13/03 – 17/03
14) The White Lionness* – Henning Mankell – 19/03 – 22/03
15) Sidetracked* – Henning Mankell – 22/03 – 07/04
16) Artemis Fowl & the Opal Deception – 25/03 – 27/03
17) Macbeth* – William Shakespeare – 08/04 – 19/04
18) UnLunDun – China Mieville – 08/04 – 23/04
19) The Practical Princess – Jay Williams – 22/04 – 22/04
20) Anne’s House of Dreams – LM Montgomery – 25/04 – 27/04
21) The Starlight Barking – Dodie Smith – 28/04 – 01/05
22) Rilla of Ingleside – LM Montgomery – 02/05 – 07/05
23) Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery – 12/05 – 13/05
24) Anne of Avonlea – LM Montgomery – 15/05 – 17/05
25) Anne of Windy Willows – LM Montgomery – 20/05 – 23/05
26) American Gods – Neil Gaiman – 24/05 – 05/06
27) Circus Shoes – Noel Streatfield – 26/05 – 28/05
28) Pongwiffy & the Goblins’ Revenge – Kaye Umansky – 28/05 – 29/05
29) Public Enemy* – Henrik Ibsen (translation by ?) – 01/06 – 01/06
30) The Eyre Affair – Jasper Fforde – 06/06 – 09/06
31) Artemis Fowl & the Lost Colony – Eoin Colfer – 10/06 – 15/06
32) Lost in a Good Book – Jasper Fforde – 16/06 – 19/06
33) Well of Lost Plots – Jasper Fforde – 19/06 – 24/06
34) Artemis Fowl & the Time Paradox – 25/06 – 28/06
35) Something Rotten – Jasper Fforde – 29/06 – 07/07
36) Red Seas Under Red Skies – Scott Lynch – 08/07 – 14/07
37) Old Magic* – Marianne Curley – 16/07 – 21/07
38) The Sword in the Stone – TH White – 24/07 – 26/07
39) The Witch in the Wood – TH White – 26/07 – 29/07
40) The Ill-Made Knight – TH White – 29/07 – 29/07
41) The Candle in the Wind – TH White – 29/07 – 01/08
42) The Book of Merlyn – TH White – 01/08 – 04/08
43) Wool* – Hugh Howey – 04/08 – 19/08
44) A Little Princess – Francis Hodgson Burnett – 05/08 – 06/08
45) First Among Sequels – Jasper Fforde – 12/08 – 18/08
46) The Underground City* – Jules Verne – 21/08 – 25/08
47) One of our Thursdays Is Missing – Jasper Fforde – 21/08 – 25/08
48) Shift* – Hugh Howey – 26/08 – 01/09
49) Six Cousins at Mistletoe Farm – Enid Blyton – 27/08 – 28/08
50) How to Climb Mont Blanc in a Skirt* – Mick Conefrey – 30/08 – 07/09
51) Little Old Mrs Pepperpot – Alf Proysen – 30/08 – 05/09
52) Rivers of London* – Ben Aaronovitch – 01/09 – 12/09
53) The Brownies on Television – Pamela Sykes – 08/09 – 08/09
54) Blood & Chocolate – Annette Curtis Klaus – 08/09 – 27/09
55) The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien – 15/09 – 22/09
56) The Enchanted Wood – Enid Blyton – 22/09 – 30/09
57) My Uncle Oswald* – Roald Dahl – 28/09 – 28/09
58) Little Lord Fauntleroy* – Francis Hodgson Burnett – 05/10 – 18/11
59) Republic of Thieves* – Scott Lynch – 10/10 – 11/10
60) Childrenof Willow Farm – Enid Blyton – 16/10 – 17/10
61) Names for the Sea* – Sarah Moss – 23/10 – 30/10
62) Last Term at Malory Towers – Enid Blyton – 28/10 – 28/10
63) Dust* – Hugh Howey – 30/10 – 24/11
64) Artemis Fowl & the Seventh Dwaft – Eoin Colfer – 25/12 – 25/12

Books I didn’t finish:
1) The Chemickal Marriage* – GW Dahlquist – 24/04 –
2) The First Law – Joe Abercrombie – 28/09 –
3) Egil’s Saga – Snorri Sturlasson – 01/12-

Books I Read in 2012

1) – The Magician’s Nephew – CS Lewis – 02/01 – 02/01
2) – The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe – CS Lewis – 02/01 – 02/01
3) – The Horse and His Boy – CS Lewis – 03/01 – 08/01
4) – Prince Caspian – CS Lewis – 08/01 – 11/01
5) – The Voyage of the Dawn Treader – CS Lewis – 12/01 – 13/01
6) – The Silver Chair – CS Lewis – 13/01 – 14/01
7) – The Last Battle – CS Lewis – 16/01 – 18/01
8) – Sabriel – Garth Nix – 20/01 – 25/01
9) – The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Arthur Conan Doyle – 26/01 – 04/02
10) – The Burning Girl* – Mark Billingham – 04/02 – 11/02
11) – Lifeless* – Mark Billingham – 12/02 – 18/02
12) – Chocky – John Wyndham – 18/02 – 18/02
13) – The Supernaturalist – Eoin Colfer – 21/02 – 25/02
14) – The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes – Arthur Conan Doyle – 25/02 – 28/02
15) – Three Go to the Chalet School* – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 28/02 – 29/02
16) – The Hockey Term at Trebizon – Anne Digby – 01/03 – 01/03
17) – Boy Trouble at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 02/03 – 02/03
18) – More Trouble at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 03/03 – 03/03
19) – The Tennis Term at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 03/03 – 03/03
20) – Into the Fourth at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 04/03 – 05/03
21) – Across the Wall* – Garth Nix – 04/03 – 11/03
22) – Fourth Year Triumphs at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 05/03 – 05/03
23) – The Ropemaker – Peter Dickinson – 12/03 – 26/03
24) – Quantum of Tweed: The Man in the Nissan Micra – Conn Igguldon – 17/03 – 17/03
25) – The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch – 26/03 – 03/04
26) – Buried* – Mark Billingham – 04/04 – 09/04
27) – Matilda – Roald Dahl – 09/04 – 11/04
28) – Death Message* – Mark Billingham – 12/05 – 26/05
29) – The Nearly-Weds – Jane Costello – 18/04 – 20/04
30) – Emily Climbs – LM Montgomery – 21/04 – 25/04
31) – The Ghostly Term at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 29/04 – 29/04
32) – Fifth Year Friendships at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 29/04 – 29/04
33) – Secret Letters at Trebizon* – Anne Digby – 29/04 – 29/04
34) – Kursk – Bryony Lavery – 27/05 – 28/12
35) – Island of Adventure – Enid Blyton – 27/05 – 28/05
36) – The Prose Edda* – Snorri Sturlusson – 31/08 – 05/06
37) – Jar City* – Arnaldur Indriðason – 06/06 – 13/06
38) – Poetic Edda* – – – 02/08 – 26/08
39) – The Named – Marianne Curley – 17/06 – 01/07
40) – Long Way Down – Ewan McGregor & Charley Boorman – 23/06 – 13/07
41) – The Valley of Adventures – Enid Blyton – 14/07 – 14/07
42) – Artemis Fowl & the Last Guardian* – Eoin Colfer – 14/07 – 16/07
43) – Journey to the Centre of the Earth – Jules Verne – 16/07 – 20/07
44) – Artemis Fowl – Eoin Colfer – 21/07 – 22/07
45) – Artemis Fowl & the Arctic Incident – Eoin Colfer – 23/07 – 28/07
46) – Blood & Chocolate – Annette Curtis Klaus – 29/07 – 31/07
47) – What Katy Did – Susan Coolidge – 06/08 – 06/08
48) – Excitements at the Chalet School – Elinor M Brent-Dyer – 07/08 – 11/08
49) – Aurorarama* – Jean-Christophe Valtat – 14/08 – 12/09
50) – Five on a Treasure Island – Enid Blyton – 16/08 – 16/08
51) – Five Go Adventuring Again – Enid Blyton – 16/08 – 16/08
52) – Five Run Away Together – Enid Blyton – 16/08 – 18/08
53) – Five Go to Smugglers Top – Enid Blyton – 23/08 – 23/08
54) – How to be a Woman* – Caitlin Moran – 26/08 – 29/08
55) – Saga of the Volsungs* – – – 03/09 – 06/09
56) – Bloodline* – Mark Billingham – 07/09 – 19/09
57) – The Story of the 12 Tribes of Lemming Island – Richard Biltcliffe – 15/09 – 15/09
58) – May on Motors – James May – 19/09 – 07/10
59) – The Legend of Sigurd & Gudrun* – JRR Tolkien – 01/10 – 11/10
60) – Minders – Diana Hendry – 10/10 – 10/10
61) – Third Form at Mallory Towers – Enid Blyton – 13/10 – 14/10
62) – The Worst Witch Strikes Again* – Jill Murphy – 17/10 – 22/10
63) – Neverwhere – Neil Gaiman – 12/10 – 18/10
64) – The Saga of the People of Laxardal – – – 19/10 – 21/11
65) – The Woman Who Died A Lot* – Jasper Fforde – 22/10 – 30/10
66) – Riders – Jilly Cooper – 31/10 – 12/11
67) – The Story of Doctor Dolittle – Hugo Lofting – 12/11 – 17/11
68) – The Tale of the Body Thief – Anne Rice – 21/11 – 25/11
69) – Shades of Grey* – Jasper Fforde – 05/12 – 12/12
70) – In the Fifth at Mallory Towers – Enid Blyton – 26/12 – 26/12
71) – Father Christmas* – Raymond Briggs – 24/12 – 24/12
72) – Father Christmas Goes on Holiday* – Raymond Briggs – 28/12 – 28/12
73) – The Incredible Adventures of Professor Branestawn – Norman Hunter – 27/12 – 31/12